Absolutely Furious

Discussion in 'Off-Topic & Chit Chat' started by tx_cowgirl, Feb 15, 2008.

  1. tx_cowgirl Honored Member

    I'm not sure. I think at first it might make him back off and re-evalutate his decision to confront me with such a high level of aggression, but then again he may get used to that. I don't think it would make him turn and run, as brave as he is. I might have to just get creative and see what I can come up with. Even if he doesn't find something scary, perhaps the irritating noise of pots and pans or rattle cans is enough to eventually make him want to leave. I have thought about dog-deterrant sprays, but haven't tried them just yet. My first action after helping Mud was to fill the gap at the bottom of the fence. It wasn't large by any means, but just big enough for his muzzle to slip under and grab Mud's leg. He's a medium-sized dog, maybe 50 pounds if that. Like I said, he hasn't been out lately so fortunately he hasn't caused any problems as of yet. I've even tried some training with him. He's so aggressive that I of course can't get too close, but I have tried avoiding eye contact with him and using my body language to project confidence but not aggression. I try to make myself seem as neutral as possible, and never walk head-on towards him. I usually ignore him completely but keep a wary eye on him at all times. When he shows no aggression, I've tried continuing to ignore him(rewarding him because there is no stressful attack situation and he sees that I don't pose a threat). I thought of tossing food when he shows no aggression, but I don't want him seeing me as a food source or thinking that being near me means he gets rewarded. I'd prefer that he ignored me entirely. Anyway, I've tried using my body language in a variety of ways to see how he reacts and try to teach him without actually getting too close that I am no threat to him or his property. Nothing has worked. When he decides to act aggressively, of course I have to defend myself so that just makes him regress more. He does not in any way seem to be the fear-aggressive type, as I've never even seen him so much as lay his ears back.
    Lol, I need to get a llama. Llamas and canines are natural born enemies, and a llama can and will attack a dog if it feels threatened. They can easily kill one(not that I'm a cruel-hearted witch and want the dog to die), and will protect their pasture-buddies without hesitation. Donkeys are usually the same way, but unfortunately it's the minis that usually get attacked. They just can't defend themselves against a large dog.

  2. landseer Well-Known Member

    Howdy Tx cowgirl,
    I try to give some hints to solve the problems you have with your friend. It's something I have learnt by reading books and I hope they can help you.
    The first thing you could try (probably you have already done) is the Linda Tellington's T-Touch. It's a method based on massages in particular parts of the dog's body which help to solve psychological and physical problems. I hae tried some of them with Chantal and they really work.
    The second help is taken from Jane Fennell's method. She has studied the wolves' behaviour and she has realized that a wolf pack has four main ways of relating to each other especially the relationship between the alpha wolf and the rest of the pack. According to JF's method you have to assert the alpha role with your dog and two things are important:
    1) When you feed your dog you have to hold his bowl and in front of him you have to eat something ( for example a biscuit) then giving him his food. This is because in the pack the alpha wolf is the first to eat.
    2) When you enter a fence, your home or any other place with him you MUST be the first one to enter and then he must follow you.
    According to JF's method you must affirm your leadership of alpha wolf on your dog.
    All this worked out good with Chantal....who knows...it can help you as well. :-)
    Hoping I have been helpful I greet you and all the Academist friends :-)
    mario aka Landseer and Chantal
  3. landseer Well-Known Member

    Well....I have read the whole thread and I realized I have misunderstood the thing. I thought the dog giving troubles was one of yours. Well, so sorry cowgirl for the misunderstanding...hope my post can help someone! :-)
  4. l_l_a New Member

    I think a booby trap for the neighbor's dog is in order!! I got this idea from watching Bugs Bunny/Road Runner cartoons with my 6-year-old niece:

    Step 1: Get a spring-loaded net. I'm sure you can find one online, the internet is a wonderful resource!! hehe! Bugs Bunny always gets everything he needs from a company called Acme. (and by the way Acme sells dog whistles for training too! Seriously. I had one.)

    Step 2: set up said net on the neighbors' side of the fence. You might want to wait for a time when neighbor and dogs are not in. Otherwise, have an assistant distract the neighbor dogs with pieces of nice juicy steak while you get to work

    Step 3: Cover net up with leaves or other stuff to camouflage it and look inconspicuous

    Step 4: All done! now when neighbor's dog tries to drag Mud under the fence, they will step in the net and activate the spring and get trapped in the net!

    Step 5: You and Mud stand nearby and gloat and make faces at the trapped dogs


    Seriously though, maybe the clanging pots and pans won't scare the dog at all but maybe will irritate his eardrums enough that he'll just find the whole situation distasteful enough to leave rather than stick around and continuing aggressing. It sounds like an extremely frustrating situation, and all the more because the owner is not taking any responsibility. I don't suppose there's Homeowners Association there is there?

    Or what about spraying a garden hose at the dog? I've also read and been told that this can startle aggressive dogs out of their frenzied state. One time at the dog park when fight broke out couple of us grabbed the dog dishes of water and poured it over the fighting dogs to break up the fight and it worked.
  5. chevycgc Well-Known Member

    They only caught two or three of the dogs and they belonged to a guy who lived in a mobile home on some neighboring property belonging to a big plant nursery. They found out later that the other dogs that they never caught were buddies of the dogs who were caught and were owned by the owner of the nursery. But because they weren't seen by animal control they didn't go after the dogs. So they got away with it.

    Sally
  6. tx_cowgirl Honored Member

    Landseer--lol, since you mentioned it, I love T-Touch. ^^ I use it on all of my dogs, horses, and even my show steers. I haven't personally studied Jane Fennell, but I've heard of part of that from many different trainers. I teach my dogs to wait for their food and wait at the door/gate until I give them a release cue.
    |_|_a--Haha!! Very nice. I'll have to give Acme a call and place my order. xD I haven't heard of any Homeowners Association here, but there may be one that I don't know about. I've thought about the garden hose, and have used it, but sometimes you just can't get to it very quick. He hasn't been around lately...guess they've kept him closed up. (Wow.)
  7. l_l_a New Member

    Super soaker!!
    http://www.sscentral.org/

    I can just see you everytime you take your dogs out into the back yard for their potty break, you have to 'gear up' with Super-soaker, pots and pans, golf club etc.. ! :)

Share This Page

 
 
 
Real Time Analytics