Flatulance in dogs?

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by marineangel, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. snooks Experienced Member

    The latest research on elevated dog dishes actually contribute significantly in studies to bloat/stomach torsion though the popular myth is they help prevent it. Studies done with large breed dogs esp Danes indicated that elevated bowls had a huge increase in torsions. I was falsely under the impression also until I dug in and read more.

    http://www.web-rover.com/doghealth/caninebloat.php
    http://www.healthypets.com/gdvcaninebloat.html
    http://www.rottweiler.net/forums/nu...-elevated-feeding-bowl-high-chance-bloat.html

    The cause of canine gas is not primarily eating air. The air would more likely lead to torsion risk for a fast eating dog. Change food before going to extraordinary measures to change the way the dog eats. There are bowls designed to help them eat slower but putting their dinner in a large Kong and freezing it will ensure they eat slowly and safely. The food dish is considered by many dog experts to be the modern bane of the dog’s world.

    Gas is the natural and unavoidable by product of the breakdown and fermentation of food in the gastrointestinal tract producing methane and sugary foods like beans ferment so do sugary dog foods containing corn and corn by products, many grains (liquor comes from fermented grain), and other foods that your dog doesn't really digest anyway. Eating air doesn't produce gas just as with humans esp not the really smelly ones since swallowed air consists primarily of oxygen and nitrogen in the end anyway. Humans that drink carbonated beverage don't get gas they primarily burp. When they eat things that ferment in the intestines they get gas composted of methane and sulfurous compounds which smells. All humans fart on average 20 times per day and all dogs do fart some in a day. To eliminate it is not possible, however, quality feed and addressing food allergies or other medical conditions are a successful solution.

    Look at the food first and give your dog some healthy natural digestive aids like probiotics (contained in green unbleached tripe) or as a powder sprinkled on the food. Dog specific enzymes prevent the fermentation hence the smell. I like animal essentials probiotics. Change to a higher quality kibble not full of filler and all the garbage science diet, Purina, eukanuba, iams, and many of the grocery store kibbles put in their food to make the bulk cheaper for them to sell and make more profit per unit weight. Foods that contain ingredients that don't sound like food you recognize like the waste product corn gluten and animal digest are not going to produce a gas free dog. Garbage in garbage out. Remember too, a more expensive food isn't necessarily more expensive. If it is better quality and not full of fillers the dog can't digest he will need to eat less and will use the nutrients more efficiently. $$/Kcal/cup isn't the rule to judge dog food by.

    This could also be a food allergy like lactose intolerance in humans. Change the protein source and get a better food before you do anything else. Here's to less stink from your pooch. :dogtongue2: It never has been that big of a deal to me to smell a little gas now and then, it's not like it's bad for your health. Maybe your appetite. :dogohmy: LOL


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