Can I use Pinetarsol to bath dog ?

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by sheezza, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. sheezza New Member

    Hi guys , I was just up at the chemist & I noticed the Pinetarsol ( I hope you have it in America)
    It is a human bath wash for itchy skin ,==supposed to be very good , I have tried everything for Ralph's allergies ,I usually use Alloveen shampoo which does not help him at all , I put apple cider vinigar in his drinking water , he is on the BARF diet & he has been having telfast allergy pills which don't help ,I'm changing them to Phenergan tomorrow the vet won't give him cortisone injections even though he's miserable because he doesn't have welts
    So what do you think about the Pinetarsol :doghuh:

  2. CollieMan Experienced Member

    The only reference I could find on the web with regards to using it on dogs had, as you might expect from the web, very mixed views. Some claim (anecdotally I must add) to use it with success, some warn against it, particularly if the exact cause of the dog's condition is not known.

    Me, I would very certainly err on the side of caution and not use it.
  3. sheezza New Member

    Thanks Collieman , I didn't even think of looking it up on the web , :dogrolleyes::dogrolleyes:
  4. snooks Experienced Member

    This is specifically a human product with a very specific ph that is pretty harsh so don't use it on your dog. It has a fairly high incidence of side effects in humans including facial burns. You know when you get a tingly or burning sensation with a dandruff shampoo? That may be ok if your doc has prescribed it for your condition but for a dog it could cause chemical burns. From the little I looked up it also seems to be a skin treatment not nec a scalp or hair growing area treatment. Unless a vet tells me I'm not going to get anything around the sensitive areas of my dog also. This is also a treatment for immune (eczema psoriasis) disorders and fungi (ringworm, jock itch) so unless that is a diagnosed problem go for something much more gentle. I have eczema and I would not put any of the stuff I use on my dogs, it's a wash hands after type of stuff.

    Use a non-human (it has the wrong ph and can be very harsh for dog skin) dog specific non allergenic shampoo. Human shampoo is very very drying and irritating to dog skin (even baby shampoo is bad for dogs). When my ACD had allergy problems a shampoo from the vet called derma-soothe worked great, there is also a cream rinse and a soothing spray). I go to organic or raw feed suppliers and they have shelves of natural product (no-soap) dog shampoos that are meant to clean hair and soothe skin. Since the derma-soothe came in a small bottle and I have a big oily coated dog I usually break the surface tension or waterproof nature of the dogs coat oil with the bigger bottle of organic shampoo and lather and rinse then go over again with the derma-soothe leaving on for the recommended 15 mins (I think) that it required. I take a squeaky toy and food in the shower with me and just massage the entire time. Ask the vet for an appropriate Rx shampoo or one they sell or recommend (don't ask the tech ask the vet) and a cheaper alternative if you need it OTC.

    If he's this miserable I would consider changing the protein source, he could be allergic to whatever protein you're feeding with BARF. What is he eating every day? And switch to distilled water (it's what changed my dogs' horrible problems, the tap water was making them sick). Give every test of new things 8 weeks and only change one thing at a time so you can nail it down. Has he been tested for hormone levels (thyroid and cortisol come to mind), a full blood spectrum, allergy tested, and fecal tests?

    Have you tried any diet testing or allergy testing? Some dogs are actually allergic to humans, just like we are allergic to them. This is rare but changing a few things wrt diet and washing bedding with nonscented non-dye containing very gentle detergent and double rinsing may help. ( use scent free fabric softener if you must or scent free dryer sheets if you must)

    The cortisone injection may help for a while but it will mask symptoms of allergies possibly for months. Keep that in mind while changing food that after steroids that your results will be meaningless. I think I would change protein sources anyway maybe a couple of weeks before the steroids unless he's totally miserable. All with your vet's ok of course. If you go ahead ask when you can expect them to wear off.

    My first guess after hearing countless vets go on about my dogs' sensitivity issues was environmental (wash and sanitize bedding with baby safe non scented products), stop using things like swiffer or carpet scenting powders or glade plug in diffusers. They all contain some doggie toxic compounds and certainly possible allergens. Get distilled water for a while. Next was testing for metabolic or disease processes that can be definitively tested for like Lyme, thyroid disorder, ringworm, fungi, secondary yeast infection, mange, allergy, fecal bacteria or parasites, urine proper readings, etc.

    Has the vet def decided this is allergy and what is his/her guess to the allergen? Has he/she suggested measures to help?

    Consider adding probiotics and salmon or cod oil to your dog's diet (flax is also good). I would also stop the vinegar in the water unless the vet advised it. Changing the ph of your dog's urine can be pretty bad for their system. Some people do it do avoid tear stains on the eyes but it can be pretty bad for some sensitive dogs. Is there a reason you're using the vinegar?

    Just sort of guesses based on my similar long fought and solved issues-not that any will be right on but maybe a guide for questions to ask. A lot of vets start off guessing the most common things they see and that's not a bad practice in general. But if your dog is one of those ongoing cases which they often also hit early with steroids you'll end up dragging this on for a long time. Steroids provide some short term relief but they mask ongoing processes and don't stop them. They are also powerful drugs with side effects so though they can be a lifesaver if there is some dietary or environmental change you can make and eliminate the allergen do so. If it's tree pollen there's not much you can do.

    Several specialists told me it was usually a non-dairy protein or artificial additives to food (even fiber supplements) or grains. I don't know all the details of BARF but it looks like they use chicken beef and lamb primarily with no grains but I'm not sure what carb sources they refer to. Try another protein like fish or ostrich or venison etc. and feed only that protein source for 8 weeks.

    Some allergy forums include http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/ALLERDOG/
    and http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Canineallergiessolutions/
    I got these off dogaware.com which also discusses BARF
    This is also and interesting page from the site http://www.dogaware.com/specific.html

    Last this could all be stress and a lot of vets throw that out, though I don't believe that's ever been my problem. If there's anything going on now that is stressful for your dog see about stopping or changing it. Good luck. I know how un-fun it is to have a itchy miserable pup. :dogsad:
  5. maven New Member

    Hey Snooks, I'm wondering now about the distilled water -- after hearing the problems that you had with your dogs and the tap water when you moved, I mentioned to Bodi's breeder that I'd be bringing distilled water along for the trip home and gradually acclimating him to our Oklahoma tap water. She told me I should use purified (filtered) water instead of distilled since distilled water actually robs their bodies of some nutrients. I have no source, no other info -- just that bit of advice to use filtered instead of steam distilled water. It might be something that you want to check into though.

    ________________

    And after a bit of searching I find that this is a myth. Please disregard and carry on :)
  6. snooks Experienced Member

    The amount of minerals and salts in filtered water is still actually pretty high. Filtered water depending on reverse osmosis or charcoal takes out only a certain % of the minerals or impurities. So desperate I went with distilled since I came across it after MONTHS if two dogs with diarrhea, reading about SIBO. After all the food testing and drugs and disinfecting, bleaching my entire yard I couldn't believe it was the water. I think is was on a UC Davis article.

    A guess? We have loads of uranium here in the soil and radon in our basement and filters aren't very effective for radioactivity. Several people here that are sensitive even with filters RO and C. My dog trainer was actually tested for MS because she lost use of her hand, it was the water. :dogohmy: We even have a reservoir which I read through the testing thoroughly. We moved and bam they were sick and miserable within a week. I always drink bottles b/c I prefer the taste and they had filtered water in TX so I thought nothing about the water. I have to buy another source water anyway it might as well be distilled since I'm not able or willing to test exactly what was making them sick. NO MORE runny poo with long haired dogs. I was so worried about my growing puppy that I just went with the purest. I'm still worried how her OFA etc will turn out.

    I was also worried that neurologic damage was occuring as it was in my human friends and I might not notice if my dog's paw was tingling. :dogwacko: kind of a pain but worth it. at least they enjoyed the food testing. grilled salmon and all kinds of exotic meats. :msngiggle:

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