Competing in obedience

Discussion in 'Obedience Training' started by szecsuani, Jul 8, 2008.

  1. szecsuani Experienced Member

    So, I have just heard about this dog sport, it just started in Hungary, and I'm very untrested in it.
    Does anyone know anything about it?
    Does anyone compete in it?
    I would really like to try this (in Hungary) new dog sport. What exercises should I begin with?
    Do you know any good websites about obedience?

  2. yoyopoodle Well-Known Member

    If it is like AKC (American Kennel Club) obedience, the most important thing is to teach your dog to continue working with-out praise or repeated commands of any kind. You are allowed to say the dog's name and one command (either verbal or hand signal), and the dog needs to continue until you give the next command. The dog must do it right the first time - there is no second chance.
    I have done some of this with my first Poodle, but he would have been much happier if I had been able to praise him - or at least smile!
    Charlie refuses to work if I stop telling him he's doing a good job... he's independent and only works because I make it worth it to him.

    I would definitely recommend going to watch and talk to exhibitors before deciding whether to try it - use the methods that the people who have a really good relationship with their dog use.
  3. lurchergirl New Member

    In the UK, competitive obedience is a little different to the US... I don't know which one you will be using in Hungary.

    In the lower classes in the UK (Pre-Beginners, Beginners and I think Novice too) you can talk as much as you like to your dog and praise - with the exception of the stay exercise.

    Heelwork is one of the most important parts of obedience, but also one of the most boring for dogs. So it is important to build that up in a fun way... I teach my dogs the two elements - walking consistently with head up for long periods of time (start off short of course, build up gradually) and teach your dog the position on your left leg. Once both works well, put it together and you have your heelwork.

    Then there are retrieve, novice recall and stay exercises. I have trained every thing with a clicker.

    Here is a video of my lurcher doing a Beginners/Novice round... his heelwork is not brilliant (not always consistent and not always close enough), but everything else is good... just to give you an idea what it involves.

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=Mr7cxB-HFwo
  4. szecsuani Experienced Member

    Thanks!
    I think we will do the same competitive obedience in Hungary as in the UK, but I'm not completely sure.... :D
  5. welshherder New Member

    Which ever way it is in Hungary you and Pami will be great at it. I realize this was posted awhile ago, but keep us updated with how it is going. You will give the competition a run for their money.
    S
  6. xena98 Experienced Member

    Hi Guys
    This is my little baby she was 12 months in the video. It was held at out Royal Show. Very hard venue to compete in. Just outside where we are the are rides and where we were competing that was where the dog show was held during the day so there are lots and lots of smells. Alot of dogs do fail there as I said very hard to compete. My little girl Gabby won that class
    Hope you do enjoy
    cheers
    Danni and the girls

    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCmHMK2aCGg[/media]
  7. stormi Well-Known Member

    Hi Szecsuani,

    Sorry I didnt see this till now. I've competed in obedience in the UK (but haven't competed a dog in C or ticket (yet!)).

    How's obedience going in Hungary? Have you got your rules and regulations sorted yet? It must be so exciting to be involved in a sport right from its early days and I hope it becomes a success.

    You could check out some of the videos on YouTube, I've just typed in Crufts Championship Obedience and some nice videos are available. It will give you an idea of how obedience works at the top level in the UK (but our heelwork position is quite different to some other countries).

    I'd say the most important thing is to really work to get your dog motivated. If you have a keen dog who really wants to work with you then everything else will fall into place.
  8. stormi Well-Known Member

    Danni,

    Thanks for sharing the video of Gabby; she looks such a sweetie. I find it really interesting to see how obedience is worked in other countries. How do the classes work in Australia...I guess novice is the entry level? Our novice class is fairly simple by comparison :dogwink:
  9. cppugs New Member

    Excellent job! Very attentive and responsive! You did a fantastic job with her! Congratulations on the first!!
  10. xena98 Experienced Member

    Hi Stormie
    Our structur had changed a few years ago. The video is the second title
    We actually have been introduced a CCD class (will try and see if I can find one of Gabby) Its on lead small heelwork with figure 8 sit stand drop right and left turn, right and left about turn, slow normal and fast pace. Stand for exam and recall 1 minute sit stay and 3 minute drop stay. You saw CD. CDX longer heelwork off lead,stand for exam of lead drop on recall retrieve the dumbell on the flat and over the hurdle and broad jump which is jumping a jump that is on the ground long ways or leaving your dog and saying drop sit and return 3 sit stay and 5 minute drop stay out of site. Than its UD which is sent work and working away from you. Seekback which is doing a heel pattern a piece of leather of your scent is dropped on the ground and you send your dog to find it. There is a box out in the middle you send your dog to and than direct over a jump solid or bar. 12 articles are put out leather wood and metal and one of those will have your scent send the dog out to all those articles and they will find the scent. Silent signals that is doing heelwork with no voice and at the end you stand the dog walk away drop your dog sit your dog and call your dog and finish your dog all with no voice. Than you have gloves which is out 15 metres and there is 3 of them spaced out 6 metres and you send your dog out to one of them. You have to pass three times in each of these classes to gain a title. Once you have ud title pass another 5 with a score of 185 points you become an obedience champion OC Than there is another class called UDX and that is alot harder.

    My girls are called Xena the german coolie her official name is AGCH (agility champion) OC (obedience champion)Xena UDX(utility dog excellent) ADM(agility dog master) JDM(jumping dog master) ADO(agility dog open) JDO(jumping dog open) GDM(gamblers dog master) SDX(snooker dog excellent) SPDM(strategic pairs dog master)
    my border collie Inka is AGCH OC Bryrae Lady Inka ADM JDM ADO JDO GDX SDX SPDX
    and little Gabby is Gabrielle CD
    I will try and find some more youtube for you to see
    cheers
    Danni and the girls
  11. xena98 Experienced Member

    This is Gabbys first time in CCD
    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVzUuiE4Kss[/media]
  12. xena98 Experienced Member

    This is a video of a friend doing the scent articles in UD
    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7Q6r-VzKs4[/media]
  13. xena98 Experienced Member

    same person doing glove
    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6jzkou5kBU[/media]
  14. xena98 Experienced Member

    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGOTaztXNMQ[/media]

    This is our sendaways
  15. xena98 Experienced Member

    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2ag0YBBvb0[/media]

    This is the seekback so it gives you the idea of what UD class is all about I hope you do enjoy
    cheers
    Danni and the girls
  16. stormi Well-Known Member

    Thank you for posting Danni and for the videos. They are great to watch and to see your exercises in action. I really like the way both dogs in the videos work; they both seem so happy :dogsmile:

    Are the snooker, gambler and strategic pairs titles your dogs have agility awards?

    Here's a link to our regulations in the UK http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/download/4438/obedregs.pdf , details of classes are on pages 18-23 (will be p20 - 25 of the PDF). Our obedience excellent qualifications (after the dog's name) are awarded based on points achieved by the dog being in the first 4 placings in their class (placings can be witheld by the judge if they do not consider the dog to be of sufficient merit). The Obedience Champion title (in front of the dogs name) is awarded when a dog wins 3 Obedience Challenge Certificates (CC) under 3 different judges. Dogs must qualify to work the Championship class (by winning and being placed in our highest open class). A (CC) is awarded to teams who win the Championship class with a certain number of points of more.

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